Indie Hops Variety Descriptions:  

Cascade

Originally selected as a potential supplement to Fuggle, Cascade’s distinctive aroma quickly distinguished the variety as independent from any previous groupings of brewing hops, launching Cascade down a path of its own.  Still the workhorse for craft brewers, Cascade is the hop that defines "American Ale", and one of the first distinctive aroma hops released by the USDA breeding program at Oregon State University (1972).  Cascade aroma can be described as floral, minty, and a bit spicy.  Primarily used for flavor and aroma additions, Cascade has moderate bittering capacity as well.  Named for the mountain range that forms the Willamette Valley’s eastern border, Cascade will forever be an American Classic. For more on the history of Cascades, please click here.

  Alpha Acid 4.5 - 7.0%
  Beta Acid 4.5 - 7.0%
  Cohumulone 40% of alpha acids
  Storability 48 - 52% alpha acids remaining after 6 months at 68°F
  Total Oil 0.8 - 1.5 mls/100 grams
  Myrcene 45 - 60% of total oil
  Humulene 10 - 16% of total oil
  Caryophyllene 3 - 6% of total oil
  Farnesene 4 - 8 % of total oil
Cascade

 


Centennial

Often referred to as “Super Cascade” for its Cascade-like aroma combined with higher bittering potential, Centennial came to life in 1974 at the USDA Prosser, Washington facility from a cross involving Brewer’s Gold, Fuggle, East Kent Golding, a dash of this and a dash of that.  Citrus and floral tones dominate with this aroma variety, packaged with substantial alpha acid levels that make Centennial a versatile hop.  Lack of macro brewery interest nearly rang the death bell for Centennial before craft brewers threw out a lifeline.  Today Centennial is a craft favorite and growing fast in popularity.  Only recently was Centennial planted in Oregon, with initial results that are sure to give this variety another boost.  For more on the history of Centennial, please click here.

  Alpha Acid 9.5 - 11.5%
  Beta Acid 3.5 - 4.5%
  Cohumulone 29 - 30% of alpha acids
  Storability 60 - 65% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 68°F
  Total Oil 1.5 - 2.3 mls/100 grams
  Myrcene 45 - 55% of total oil
  Humulene 10 - 18% of total oil
  Caryophyllene 5 - 8% of total oil
  Farnesene <1% of total oil
Centennial

Chinook

Yes, we keep saying we specialize in aroma hops and many think of Chinook as a high alpha bittering variety.  Craft brewers across the country, following their pesky curiousity and acute senses, have discovered Chinook’s aroma and flavor potential as well.  Even single-hop IPA’s are popping up with Chinook utilized from early additions through dry-hopping.  It’s hard to argue against Chinook as an aroma/flavor option after experiencing the hint of spiciness along with a more distinctive citrus – especially grapefruit- character.  For more on the history of Chinook, please click here.

  Alpha Acid 12 - 15%
  Beta Acid 3.5 - 4.5%
  Cohumulone 33% of alpha acids
  Storability 60 - 70% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 68°F
  Total Oil 1.5 - 2.2 mls/100 grams
  Myrcene 35-40% of total oil
  Humulene 22% of total oil
  Caryophyllene 10% of total oil
  Farnesene <1% of total oil
Chinook Hop

Columbia

The Pacific Northwest’s main inland waterway carried Lewis and Clark to America’s west coast and the Pacific Ocean.  The “mighty” Columbia River also inspired the naming of this little-known hop variety, and for good reason.  Half-sister to Willamette and semi-finalist with Willamette in A-B trials for a new “Budweiser” hop, Columbia was favored by both brewers and sensory panels, appearing poised to be part of that great flow of American Lager and worthy of a great river’s name.  But, monarchic culture overruled the “boots on the ground” and chose Willamette- another epic hop- primarily on the belief that a true aroma hop should be low in alpha acids.

Columbia alpha acids range from 8-10%, perhaps problematic in an American Lager, but in a sweet spot for many craft brewers.  With all the great attributes of Willamette, plus a bit more “punch” and a hint of refreshing lemon citrus, we believe Columbia is a natural for craft and deserves to be resurrected.  Columbia will be available beginning with the 2011 harvest.

  Alpha Acid 8 - 10%
  Beta Acid 3 - 5%
  Cohumulone 40%
  Storability 75 - 80% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 68°F
  Total Oil .9 - 1.4 mls/100 grams
  Myrcene 45 - 55% of total oil
  Humulene 17% of total oil
  Caryophyllene 7% of total oil
  Farnesene 4% of total oil
 

Fuggle

An Old English classic, Fuggle has been at home in Oregon’s Willamette Valley since the early 1900’s.  The hop developed so well here that “Oregon Fuggles” became synonomous with premium Fuggle hops grown in the USA.  This reputation led to the crossing of a tetraploid female Fuggle to achieve triploid (sterile/seedless) offspring.  One new variety that resulted was Willamette, a favorite of US brewers large and small ever since.  The original is...well...still the original, and a hop you can count on in beers ranging from English-style ales through American Lagers- lots of range for an old gal!

  Alpha Acid 4 - 6%
  Beta Acid 2 - 3%
  Cohumulone 27%
  Storability 75% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 68°F
  Total Oil .5 - .8 mls/100 grams
  Myrcene 43% of total oil
  Humulene 27% of total oil
  Caryophyllene 9% of total oil
  Farnesene 4% of total oil
Fuggle

Golding

Sometimes things just fall into place and you don’t have to apply science, sensibility and patience to get what you’re after.  The East Kent Golding is such a case.  Since its introduction in 1994 this English variety has grown well in Oregon, producing a fine English hop aroma true to the original.  Popular in nearly any ale style- English or Belgian-, craft brewers would lose their link to history without Goldings.

  Alpha Acid 5.0 - 6.0%
  Beta Acid 2 - 3%
  Cohumulone 29% of alpha acids
  Storability 75% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 68°F
  Total Oil .8 - 1.0 mls/100 grams
  Myrcene 46% of total oil
  Humulene 25 - 30% of total oil
  Caryophyllene 8-9% of total oil
  Farnesene <1% of total oil 
Golding

Horizon

The quest for higher alpha in hop varieties over the years has led to some interesting oil profiles as well.  A few of these “dual purpose” hops have made it into the craft brewing mainstream (i.e. Centennial and Chinook), but Horizon has remained scarce due to inconsistent availability.  Whether this is due to lower yields than other dual purpose varieties, or a desire to promote proprietary hops such as Simcoe instead, we don’t know.  We do know that Horizon’s versatile brewing quailities are well suited to the craft industry, so we’ve gone out on the proverbial limb and contracted to have Horizon grown.  Brewer’s looking for alpha power, low cohumulone, and lots of aromatic oil character will be pleased.

  Alpha Acid 11 - 15%
  Beta Acid 5 - 8%
  Cohumulone 19%
  Storability 75-90% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 68°F
  Total Oil 1.5 - 2.5 mls/100 grams
  Myrcene 60 - 70% of total oil
  Humulene 9% of total oil
  Caryophyllene 6% of total oil
  Farnesene 2% of total oil
Horizon

Nugget

A USDA high alpha variety that helped make Willamette Valley growers competitive in the alpha market until the advent of privately-bred super alpha varieties, Nugget is an exceptionally “clean” bittering hop with strong yields that make it a solid value.  No “machine oil” baggage to boil away from this hop.  Some crafties even find Nugget’s pleasant, mild aroma desirable in subtle beer styles. 

Born of the same mother as Horizon, it goes to show that while one sister may like to stick out in a crowd, her sibling may be happy to contribute quietly behind the scenes.

  Alpha Acid 11 - 15%
  Beta Acid 3 - 8%
  Cohumulone 26%
  Storability 75 - 85% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 68°F
  Total Oil 1.2 - 2.3 mls/100 grams
  Myrcene 50-60% of total oil
  Humulene 17% of total oil
  Caryophyllene 10% of total oil
  Farnesene <1% of total oil
 
 

Perle

Bred from Northern Brewer at the German Institute for Hop Research, Perle has adapted well to growing conditions in the northwestern US.  While some insist it is most useful as a bittering hop, others are hooked on Perle’s flavor and aroma contributions.  We think of Perle as a dual-purpose gift from Bavaria!  Growing numbers of craft brewers are finding Perle an important weapon in their arsenal, with solid bittering power coupled with a healthy dose of “noble” aroma character.

  Alpha Acid 8 - 10%
  Beta Acid 4 - 5%
  Cohumulone 28%
  Storability 75 - 80% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 68°F
  Total Oil .6 - 1.2 mls/100 grams
  Myrcene 44% of total oil
  Humulene 28% of total oil
  Caryophyllene 10% of total oil
  Farnesene <1% of total oil
Perle

US Tettnanger

Transplanted to Oregon, East Kent Golding stayed true to its original English character, yet German Tettnanger has settled here and taken on the character of the classic English variety Fuggle!  At least no breeding tweaks were necessary.  The result is an outstanding hop prized by craft brewers.  German landrace heritage transplanted in America to offer classic English Ale hop aroma… the brew kettle turned melting pot.

  Alpha Acid 4.0 - 5.0%
  Beta Acid 3.0 - 5.0%
  Cohumulone 24% of alpha acids
  Storability 60% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 68°F
  Total Oil .5 - 1.0 mls/100 grams
  Myrcene 40.6% of total oil
  Humulene 18 - 22% of total oil
  Caryophyllene 6 - 7% of total oil
  Farnesene 9 - 11% of total oil
US Tettnanger

Willamette

Named for the valley in which it was born, Willamette holds a powerful place in USA aroma hop history.  Anheuser-Busch wanted an aroma hop with consistent high yields and mild continental aroma.  An emphasis was placed on “mild” for balance in their light-bodied flagship beer Budweiser.  Fuggle parentage produced a solid result- mild and pleasant- so an English Ale hop finds its genetic material in the largest selling light American pilsner brand, and is still A-B’s favorite aroma variety.  While A-B are pumping out millions of barrels of Budweiser with ton after ton of Willamettes, craft brewers are serving up luscious ales with Willamette’s kiss at the finish.  Stand up and salute toward St. Louis to pay homage for one of many captivating USA aroma hops brought on by A-B. For more on the history of Willamette, please click here.

  Alpha Acid 5.0 - 8.0%
  Beta Acid 3.0 - 5.0%
  Cohumulone 29 - 35% of alpha acids
  Storability 65% alpha acids remaining after 6 months storage at 68°F
  Total Oil .8 - 1.2 mls/100 grams
  Myrcene 45 - 50% of total oil
  Humulene 18 - 22% of total oil
  Caryophyllene 6 - 7% of total oil
  Farnesene 4 - 6% of total oil   
Willamette
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